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Ellen Lupton, Thinking with Type
World renown ANAL Tours at Openhagen #funny #vandalism (tomada con Instagram en Gammel Strand)

World renown ANAL Tours at Openhagen #funny #vandalism (tomada con Instagram en Gammel Strand)

Ever heard about the prisoner’s dilemma? [Wikipedia link]

It’s a classical game theory example where two people (A & B) have to make a decision between being cooperating or being selfish.

  • case 1: If both A & B cooperate, they both win
  • case 2: if both A & B are selfish, they both lose
  • case 3: if A cooperates but B is selfish, A loses and B wins bigger than in case 1

Apparently, there’s a British TV show by the name of ‘Golden Balls’ that uses this same mechanic. The negotiation part is the biggest WTF I’ve seen in a while. Enjoy!

Yesterday, Google acquired Sparrow, the makers of my favorite email client. Here’s what Sparrow had to say about the operation:

sparrowmail:

We’re excited to announce that Sparrow has been acquired by Google! Read more here.

While this message is carefully written, the real PR bullshit comes in the email they’ve sent to their users. I’ve selected the stinging parts of the text:

We’re excited to announce that Sparrow has been acquired by Google!
We will continue to make available our existing products (…) & we do not plan to release new features for the Sparrow apps.

They could as well have said:

We’re excited to announce that Google is gonna pay us shitloads of money to stop developing Sparrow.

Say goodbye to Sparrow for iPad. As of yet, it isn’t an existing product and the text suggests it will never be. Bid farewell to those features we had been promised too (push notifications and so on). Dear Sparrow team, how is it good news for your users when you’re telling them that they’re being left behind? I must have missed the part I should be celebrating.

When you’ve built such a big customer base, shouldn’t you have a little more respect towards your users? They’re the ones that helped you get there in the first place and leaving them behind doesn’t seem to be the most respectful approach.

So yes, thanks a lot. We couldn’t be happier.

Yesterday, Google acquired Sparrow, the makers of my favorite email client. Here’s what Sparrow had to say about the operation:

sparrowmail:

We’re excited to announce that Sparrow has been acquired by Google! Read more here.

While this message is carefully written, the real PR bullshit comes in the email they’ve sent to their users. I’ve selected the stinging parts of the text:

We’re excited to announce that Sparrow has been acquired by Google!

We will continue to make available our existing products (…) & we do not plan to release new features for the Sparrow apps.

They could as well have said:

We’re excited to announce that Google is gonna pay us shitloads of money to stop developing Sparrow.

Say goodbye to Sparrow for iPad. As of yet, it isn’t an existing product and the text suggests it will never be. Bid farewell to those features we had been promised too (push notifications and so on). Dear Sparrow team, how is it good news for your users when you’re telling them that they’re being left behind? I must have missed the part I should be celebrating.

When you’ve built such a big customer base, shouldn’t you have a little more respect towards your users? They’re the ones that helped you get there in the first place and leaving them behind doesn’t seem to be the most respectful approach.

So yes, thanks a lot. We couldn’t be happier.

taken at Bordeaux

taken at Bordeaux

I was pretty sure jukeboxes were dead in Spain until I saw this one at Aranda de Duero. It’s filled up with The Strokes, Jeff Buckley and Los Planetas. If only I could find some of these at home…

I was pretty sure jukeboxes were dead in Spain until I saw this one at Aranda de Duero. It’s filled up with The Strokes, Jeff Buckley and Los Planetas. If only I could find some of these at home…

Complying with Spanish data protection law at a startup

Welcome all! This is Mikel Recondo, Plumber (& Cofounder) at Ubiquads, a Spain-based startup.

Say you want to start a business in Spain. First of all, good luck with that and be patient. There’s tons of paperwork and it can take quite a while. Oh, and you’d better not forget about LOPD & LSSI.

What the hell is that? They’re a set of laws that state the way you should do business online and how you should handle sensitive data. Spanish law is pretty strict about data protection and fines go from €6K all the way up to 600K. If you get sued… bye bye, early-stage startup.

You must comply with these laws from the moment you start collecting user data, even if you’re just collecting email adresses at a teaser page. From day one, you should:

  • obtain the users’ consent before collecting their data and contacting them
  • share links to the legal notice, privacy policy and ToS at your home page
  • show clear info on how to contact you and where to find you
  • make sure people can opt out of your site and mailing lists as easily as possible
  • tell the AEPD (Spanish Data Protection Agency) what kind of data you’re collecting and what for

This last step might be the trickiest of them all. You have to go AEPD’s website, download a form and fill it using Adobe Reader. Don’t try to go through the FAQ (25 pages long) or the guide (11 pages long), just open the form and go for it. Cross your fingers, use your digital signature and wait for AEPD to tell you everything’s OK.

It might look as too much work to get a bunch of email accounts. Hey, as Chris Martin used to say, “nobody said it was easy.”

Hello World
(and stuff like that)
Mikel Recondo